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Apple #Bendgate: No, That’s Not an iPhone 6 Plus Feature

Apple #Bendgate: No, That’s Not an iPhone 6 Plus Feature


We were just as jazzed as the next person to hear Apple announce the iPhone 6, 6 Plus and Apple Watch, but it looks like the Apple 6 Plus couldn't handle the pressure (literally). Several new reports are making it clear that Apple might have skimped on everyday wear-and-tear testing with their super skinny new release. Apparently, many of the lucky fans to have already picked up the new smartphone are pulling it out of their pockets to find the frame bent.

We get that the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus are made of aluminum and we like that it makes them lighter, but warped phones just aren’t our thing. Don’t believe the oh-so-superior iPhones are so susceptible to distorting? Unbox Therapy, a site that makes videos covering electronics and technology products, created a video showing just how prone the iPhone 6 is to bending (which you can see above). And in case you want to throw out the susceptibility of any large phone buckling under the pressure, they also made another video trying to bend some of Apple’s rivals, with no success.

So far, Apple has yet to comment, but we're wondering if these reports will this stop people from upgrading.


A slew of new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners are claiming the smartphone warps after spending the day in their pockets. Apple has yet to comment on the source of the issue, but most suspect that the product&rsquos mega-slim, aluminum body is to blame.

It seems as though Apple&rsquos thinnest smartphone ever isn&rsquot all its cracked up to be &mdash and techies are getting pretty bent out of shape over it. Less than a week after the company&rsquos big-deal release of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, users are flocking to tech blogs and message boards to warn potential buyers of a little defect they noticed in this brand new smartphone &mdash it kinda, sorta warps in your pocket. So, unless iPhone users start investing in stylish fanny packs , this is going to be a problem.

Apple has yet to comment on the headline-worthy defect, so the actual reason behind the bend hasn&rsquot been confirmed &mdash the problem very well may be limited to a small, faulty batch. However, users suspect that Apple&rsquos ambition may have gotten the best of them this time around &mdash competing for the title of &ldquoWorld&rsquos Slimmest Smartphone&rdquo may not be the most surefire way to build a lasting product. Honestly, it&rsquos a surprise most consumers didn&rsquot suspect that an aluminum body measuring in at 6.9mm thick just might lend to bending.

While putting pressure on the product won&rsquot necessarily make it unusable, it will compromise the quality of what you see on screen &mdash consumers who choose to use their warped phone could experience issues with brightness, pixilation and irregular color stripes streaking the interface.

With over 10 million units sold in its first weekend, it&rsquos safe to assume that more reports of the iPhone 6 bending and warping will be surfacing in the next few days &mdash the strange phenomenon&rsquos designated hashtag, #BendGate, is currently trending on social media.

UPDATE: The plot thickens. Or&hellip thin-ens? Apparently, Samsung&rsquos Note 3 went through the exact same pressure test and instead of failing it actually managed to survive with the same if not more pressure applied . Ouch.


A slew of new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners are claiming the smartphone warps after spending the day in their pockets. Apple has yet to comment on the source of the issue, but most suspect that the product&rsquos mega-slim, aluminum body is to blame.

It seems as though Apple&rsquos thinnest smartphone ever isn&rsquot all its cracked up to be &mdash and techies are getting pretty bent out of shape over it. Less than a week after the company&rsquos big-deal release of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, users are flocking to tech blogs and message boards to warn potential buyers of a little defect they noticed in this brand new smartphone &mdash it kinda, sorta warps in your pocket. So, unless iPhone users start investing in stylish fanny packs , this is going to be a problem.

Apple has yet to comment on the headline-worthy defect, so the actual reason behind the bend hasn&rsquot been confirmed &mdash the problem very well may be limited to a small, faulty batch. However, users suspect that Apple&rsquos ambition may have gotten the best of them this time around &mdash competing for the title of &ldquoWorld&rsquos Slimmest Smartphone&rdquo may not be the most surefire way to build a lasting product. Honestly, it&rsquos a surprise most consumers didn&rsquot suspect that an aluminum body measuring in at 6.9mm thick just might lend to bending.

While putting pressure on the product won&rsquot necessarily make it unusable, it will compromise the quality of what you see on screen &mdash consumers who choose to use their warped phone could experience issues with brightness, pixilation and irregular color stripes streaking the interface.

With over 10 million units sold in its first weekend, it&rsquos safe to assume that more reports of the iPhone 6 bending and warping will be surfacing in the next few days &mdash the strange phenomenon&rsquos designated hashtag, #BendGate, is currently trending on social media.

UPDATE: The plot thickens. Or&hellip thin-ens? Apparently, Samsung&rsquos Note 3 went through the exact same pressure test and instead of failing it actually managed to survive with the same if not more pressure applied . Ouch.


A slew of new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners are claiming the smartphone warps after spending the day in their pockets. Apple has yet to comment on the source of the issue, but most suspect that the product&rsquos mega-slim, aluminum body is to blame.

It seems as though Apple&rsquos thinnest smartphone ever isn&rsquot all its cracked up to be &mdash and techies are getting pretty bent out of shape over it. Less than a week after the company&rsquos big-deal release of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, users are flocking to tech blogs and message boards to warn potential buyers of a little defect they noticed in this brand new smartphone &mdash it kinda, sorta warps in your pocket. So, unless iPhone users start investing in stylish fanny packs , this is going to be a problem.

Apple has yet to comment on the headline-worthy defect, so the actual reason behind the bend hasn&rsquot been confirmed &mdash the problem very well may be limited to a small, faulty batch. However, users suspect that Apple&rsquos ambition may have gotten the best of them this time around &mdash competing for the title of &ldquoWorld&rsquos Slimmest Smartphone&rdquo may not be the most surefire way to build a lasting product. Honestly, it&rsquos a surprise most consumers didn&rsquot suspect that an aluminum body measuring in at 6.9mm thick just might lend to bending.

While putting pressure on the product won&rsquot necessarily make it unusable, it will compromise the quality of what you see on screen &mdash consumers who choose to use their warped phone could experience issues with brightness, pixilation and irregular color stripes streaking the interface.

With over 10 million units sold in its first weekend, it&rsquos safe to assume that more reports of the iPhone 6 bending and warping will be surfacing in the next few days &mdash the strange phenomenon&rsquos designated hashtag, #BendGate, is currently trending on social media.

UPDATE: The plot thickens. Or&hellip thin-ens? Apparently, Samsung&rsquos Note 3 went through the exact same pressure test and instead of failing it actually managed to survive with the same if not more pressure applied . Ouch.


A slew of new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners are claiming the smartphone warps after spending the day in their pockets. Apple has yet to comment on the source of the issue, but most suspect that the product&rsquos mega-slim, aluminum body is to blame.

It seems as though Apple&rsquos thinnest smartphone ever isn&rsquot all its cracked up to be &mdash and techies are getting pretty bent out of shape over it. Less than a week after the company&rsquos big-deal release of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, users are flocking to tech blogs and message boards to warn potential buyers of a little defect they noticed in this brand new smartphone &mdash it kinda, sorta warps in your pocket. So, unless iPhone users start investing in stylish fanny packs , this is going to be a problem.

Apple has yet to comment on the headline-worthy defect, so the actual reason behind the bend hasn&rsquot been confirmed &mdash the problem very well may be limited to a small, faulty batch. However, users suspect that Apple&rsquos ambition may have gotten the best of them this time around &mdash competing for the title of &ldquoWorld&rsquos Slimmest Smartphone&rdquo may not be the most surefire way to build a lasting product. Honestly, it&rsquos a surprise most consumers didn&rsquot suspect that an aluminum body measuring in at 6.9mm thick just might lend to bending.

While putting pressure on the product won&rsquot necessarily make it unusable, it will compromise the quality of what you see on screen &mdash consumers who choose to use their warped phone could experience issues with brightness, pixilation and irregular color stripes streaking the interface.

With over 10 million units sold in its first weekend, it&rsquos safe to assume that more reports of the iPhone 6 bending and warping will be surfacing in the next few days &mdash the strange phenomenon&rsquos designated hashtag, #BendGate, is currently trending on social media.

UPDATE: The plot thickens. Or&hellip thin-ens? Apparently, Samsung&rsquos Note 3 went through the exact same pressure test and instead of failing it actually managed to survive with the same if not more pressure applied . Ouch.


A slew of new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners are claiming the smartphone warps after spending the day in their pockets. Apple has yet to comment on the source of the issue, but most suspect that the product&rsquos mega-slim, aluminum body is to blame.

It seems as though Apple&rsquos thinnest smartphone ever isn&rsquot all its cracked up to be &mdash and techies are getting pretty bent out of shape over it. Less than a week after the company&rsquos big-deal release of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, users are flocking to tech blogs and message boards to warn potential buyers of a little defect they noticed in this brand new smartphone &mdash it kinda, sorta warps in your pocket. So, unless iPhone users start investing in stylish fanny packs , this is going to be a problem.

Apple has yet to comment on the headline-worthy defect, so the actual reason behind the bend hasn&rsquot been confirmed &mdash the problem very well may be limited to a small, faulty batch. However, users suspect that Apple&rsquos ambition may have gotten the best of them this time around &mdash competing for the title of &ldquoWorld&rsquos Slimmest Smartphone&rdquo may not be the most surefire way to build a lasting product. Honestly, it&rsquos a surprise most consumers didn&rsquot suspect that an aluminum body measuring in at 6.9mm thick just might lend to bending.

While putting pressure on the product won&rsquot necessarily make it unusable, it will compromise the quality of what you see on screen &mdash consumers who choose to use their warped phone could experience issues with brightness, pixilation and irregular color stripes streaking the interface.

With over 10 million units sold in its first weekend, it&rsquos safe to assume that more reports of the iPhone 6 bending and warping will be surfacing in the next few days &mdash the strange phenomenon&rsquos designated hashtag, #BendGate, is currently trending on social media.

UPDATE: The plot thickens. Or&hellip thin-ens? Apparently, Samsung&rsquos Note 3 went through the exact same pressure test and instead of failing it actually managed to survive with the same if not more pressure applied . Ouch.


A slew of new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners are claiming the smartphone warps after spending the day in their pockets. Apple has yet to comment on the source of the issue, but most suspect that the product&rsquos mega-slim, aluminum body is to blame.

It seems as though Apple&rsquos thinnest smartphone ever isn&rsquot all its cracked up to be &mdash and techies are getting pretty bent out of shape over it. Less than a week after the company&rsquos big-deal release of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, users are flocking to tech blogs and message boards to warn potential buyers of a little defect they noticed in this brand new smartphone &mdash it kinda, sorta warps in your pocket. So, unless iPhone users start investing in stylish fanny packs , this is going to be a problem.

Apple has yet to comment on the headline-worthy defect, so the actual reason behind the bend hasn&rsquot been confirmed &mdash the problem very well may be limited to a small, faulty batch. However, users suspect that Apple&rsquos ambition may have gotten the best of them this time around &mdash competing for the title of &ldquoWorld&rsquos Slimmest Smartphone&rdquo may not be the most surefire way to build a lasting product. Honestly, it&rsquos a surprise most consumers didn&rsquot suspect that an aluminum body measuring in at 6.9mm thick just might lend to bending.

While putting pressure on the product won&rsquot necessarily make it unusable, it will compromise the quality of what you see on screen &mdash consumers who choose to use their warped phone could experience issues with brightness, pixilation and irregular color stripes streaking the interface.

With over 10 million units sold in its first weekend, it&rsquos safe to assume that more reports of the iPhone 6 bending and warping will be surfacing in the next few days &mdash the strange phenomenon&rsquos designated hashtag, #BendGate, is currently trending on social media.

UPDATE: The plot thickens. Or&hellip thin-ens? Apparently, Samsung&rsquos Note 3 went through the exact same pressure test and instead of failing it actually managed to survive with the same if not more pressure applied . Ouch.


A slew of new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners are claiming the smartphone warps after spending the day in their pockets. Apple has yet to comment on the source of the issue, but most suspect that the product&rsquos mega-slim, aluminum body is to blame.

It seems as though Apple&rsquos thinnest smartphone ever isn&rsquot all its cracked up to be &mdash and techies are getting pretty bent out of shape over it. Less than a week after the company&rsquos big-deal release of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, users are flocking to tech blogs and message boards to warn potential buyers of a little defect they noticed in this brand new smartphone &mdash it kinda, sorta warps in your pocket. So, unless iPhone users start investing in stylish fanny packs , this is going to be a problem.

Apple has yet to comment on the headline-worthy defect, so the actual reason behind the bend hasn&rsquot been confirmed &mdash the problem very well may be limited to a small, faulty batch. However, users suspect that Apple&rsquos ambition may have gotten the best of them this time around &mdash competing for the title of &ldquoWorld&rsquos Slimmest Smartphone&rdquo may not be the most surefire way to build a lasting product. Honestly, it&rsquos a surprise most consumers didn&rsquot suspect that an aluminum body measuring in at 6.9mm thick just might lend to bending.

While putting pressure on the product won&rsquot necessarily make it unusable, it will compromise the quality of what you see on screen &mdash consumers who choose to use their warped phone could experience issues with brightness, pixilation and irregular color stripes streaking the interface.

With over 10 million units sold in its first weekend, it&rsquos safe to assume that more reports of the iPhone 6 bending and warping will be surfacing in the next few days &mdash the strange phenomenon&rsquos designated hashtag, #BendGate, is currently trending on social media.

UPDATE: The plot thickens. Or&hellip thin-ens? Apparently, Samsung&rsquos Note 3 went through the exact same pressure test and instead of failing it actually managed to survive with the same if not more pressure applied . Ouch.


A slew of new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners are claiming the smartphone warps after spending the day in their pockets. Apple has yet to comment on the source of the issue, but most suspect that the product&rsquos mega-slim, aluminum body is to blame.

It seems as though Apple&rsquos thinnest smartphone ever isn&rsquot all its cracked up to be &mdash and techies are getting pretty bent out of shape over it. Less than a week after the company&rsquos big-deal release of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, users are flocking to tech blogs and message boards to warn potential buyers of a little defect they noticed in this brand new smartphone &mdash it kinda, sorta warps in your pocket. So, unless iPhone users start investing in stylish fanny packs , this is going to be a problem.

Apple has yet to comment on the headline-worthy defect, so the actual reason behind the bend hasn&rsquot been confirmed &mdash the problem very well may be limited to a small, faulty batch. However, users suspect that Apple&rsquos ambition may have gotten the best of them this time around &mdash competing for the title of &ldquoWorld&rsquos Slimmest Smartphone&rdquo may not be the most surefire way to build a lasting product. Honestly, it&rsquos a surprise most consumers didn&rsquot suspect that an aluminum body measuring in at 6.9mm thick just might lend to bending.

While putting pressure on the product won&rsquot necessarily make it unusable, it will compromise the quality of what you see on screen &mdash consumers who choose to use their warped phone could experience issues with brightness, pixilation and irregular color stripes streaking the interface.

With over 10 million units sold in its first weekend, it&rsquos safe to assume that more reports of the iPhone 6 bending and warping will be surfacing in the next few days &mdash the strange phenomenon&rsquos designated hashtag, #BendGate, is currently trending on social media.

UPDATE: The plot thickens. Or&hellip thin-ens? Apparently, Samsung&rsquos Note 3 went through the exact same pressure test and instead of failing it actually managed to survive with the same if not more pressure applied . Ouch.


A slew of new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners are claiming the smartphone warps after spending the day in their pockets. Apple has yet to comment on the source of the issue, but most suspect that the product&rsquos mega-slim, aluminum body is to blame.

It seems as though Apple&rsquos thinnest smartphone ever isn&rsquot all its cracked up to be &mdash and techies are getting pretty bent out of shape over it. Less than a week after the company&rsquos big-deal release of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, users are flocking to tech blogs and message boards to warn potential buyers of a little defect they noticed in this brand new smartphone &mdash it kinda, sorta warps in your pocket. So, unless iPhone users start investing in stylish fanny packs , this is going to be a problem.

Apple has yet to comment on the headline-worthy defect, so the actual reason behind the bend hasn&rsquot been confirmed &mdash the problem very well may be limited to a small, faulty batch. However, users suspect that Apple&rsquos ambition may have gotten the best of them this time around &mdash competing for the title of &ldquoWorld&rsquos Slimmest Smartphone&rdquo may not be the most surefire way to build a lasting product. Honestly, it&rsquos a surprise most consumers didn&rsquot suspect that an aluminum body measuring in at 6.9mm thick just might lend to bending.

While putting pressure on the product won&rsquot necessarily make it unusable, it will compromise the quality of what you see on screen &mdash consumers who choose to use their warped phone could experience issues with brightness, pixilation and irregular color stripes streaking the interface.

With over 10 million units sold in its first weekend, it&rsquos safe to assume that more reports of the iPhone 6 bending and warping will be surfacing in the next few days &mdash the strange phenomenon&rsquos designated hashtag, #BendGate, is currently trending on social media.

UPDATE: The plot thickens. Or&hellip thin-ens? Apparently, Samsung&rsquos Note 3 went through the exact same pressure test and instead of failing it actually managed to survive with the same if not more pressure applied . Ouch.


A slew of new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners are claiming the smartphone warps after spending the day in their pockets. Apple has yet to comment on the source of the issue, but most suspect that the product&rsquos mega-slim, aluminum body is to blame.

It seems as though Apple&rsquos thinnest smartphone ever isn&rsquot all its cracked up to be &mdash and techies are getting pretty bent out of shape over it. Less than a week after the company&rsquos big-deal release of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, users are flocking to tech blogs and message boards to warn potential buyers of a little defect they noticed in this brand new smartphone &mdash it kinda, sorta warps in your pocket. So, unless iPhone users start investing in stylish fanny packs , this is going to be a problem.

Apple has yet to comment on the headline-worthy defect, so the actual reason behind the bend hasn&rsquot been confirmed &mdash the problem very well may be limited to a small, faulty batch. However, users suspect that Apple&rsquos ambition may have gotten the best of them this time around &mdash competing for the title of &ldquoWorld&rsquos Slimmest Smartphone&rdquo may not be the most surefire way to build a lasting product. Honestly, it&rsquos a surprise most consumers didn&rsquot suspect that an aluminum body measuring in at 6.9mm thick just might lend to bending.

While putting pressure on the product won&rsquot necessarily make it unusable, it will compromise the quality of what you see on screen &mdash consumers who choose to use their warped phone could experience issues with brightness, pixilation and irregular color stripes streaking the interface.

With over 10 million units sold in its first weekend, it&rsquos safe to assume that more reports of the iPhone 6 bending and warping will be surfacing in the next few days &mdash the strange phenomenon&rsquos designated hashtag, #BendGate, is currently trending on social media.

UPDATE: The plot thickens. Or&hellip thin-ens? Apparently, Samsung&rsquos Note 3 went through the exact same pressure test and instead of failing it actually managed to survive with the same if not more pressure applied . Ouch.